November 30, 2012
fuileachd:

glukauf:

When a magnitude 6.8 earthquake shook Olympia, Wash., in 2001, shopowner Jason Ward discovered that a sand-tracing pendulum had recorded the vibrations in the image above.
Seismologists say that the “flower” at the center reflects the higher-frequency waves that arrived first; the outer, larger-amplitude oscillations record the lower-frequency waves that arrived later.
“You never think about an earthquake as being artistic — it’s violent and destructive,” Norman MacLeod, president of Gaelic Wolf Consulting in Port Townsend, told ABC News. “But in the middle of all that chaos, this fine, delicate artwork was created.”

There’s beauty in destruction.

More like there’s beauty in something that can cause destruction.  Theoretically, if there was an earthquake on some continent where no people lived, nothing would really be destroyed.  Because earthquakes rarely kill people.  What kills people are falling buildings and broken pipelines. It’s only a natural disaster if someone gets killed. Otherwise, it’s just a natural occurrence. So really, is it just the beauty of a geographical process that we, and our feeble creations, happen to get caught in the middle of?

fuileachd:

glukauf:

When a magnitude 6.8 earthquake shook Olympia, Wash., in 2001, shopowner Jason Ward discovered that a sand-tracing pendulum had recorded the vibrations in the image above.

Seismologists say that the “flower” at the center reflects the higher-frequency waves that arrived first; the outer, larger-amplitude oscillations record the lower-frequency waves that arrived later.

“You never think about an earthquake as being artistic — it’s violent and destructive,” Norman MacLeod, president of Gaelic Wolf Consulting in Port Townsend, told ABC News. “But in the middle of all that chaos, this fine, delicate artwork was created.”

There’s beauty in destruction.

More like there’s beauty in something that can cause destruction.  Theoretically, if there was an earthquake on some continent where no people lived, nothing would really be destroyed.  Because earthquakes rarely kill people.  What kills people are falling buildings and broken pipelines. It’s only a natural disaster if someone gets killed. Otherwise, it’s just a natural occurrence. So really, is it just the beauty of a geographical process that we, and our feeble creations, happen to get caught in the middle of?

(via you-got-iantowned)

October 11, 2012
"

To those who practice the tradition of Christianity…

If we are to celebrate a tradition that follows the creation story, we must celebrate the the fact that the God of creation saw each of those creations as “good.” Every drop of water, each ray of light, the darkness, textures, colors and of course life, was indeed “good.”

This creative, loving and living God that we celebrate, challenges and invites us to see this goodness for ourselves. This perfection, this beauty, and this wonder that is in itself our truest image of God incarnate.

In our manhood, womanhood, motherhood and fatherhood; in our friendships and relationships, straightness and gayness; in our our blackness, our whiteness, and sameness and our difference, we see God…
and it is indeed good.

Be proud of who you are, because yes, YOU are good.

"

A classmate of mine’s response in regards to National Coming Out Day, and ‘The Christian Case for Celebration’.

Super proud to have friends such as these, to go to a seminary such as this, and to be the creation of a God who is love.

May 15, 2012
"Nothing of the goodness of our humanity is punishable. Nothing in the way God created us."

— My Theology Professor

April 20, 2012
"As a womanist, I am concerned about and committed to the survival of an entire people - male and female, rich and poor, gay, lesbian, and straight, physically and/or emotionally challenged, and of every race and ethnicity. I believe that my rights as an African American, as a black woman, are guaranteed only when the rights of all people are guaranteed; that my liberty is restricted when that of another is restricted; that my human dignity and thus my creation by God is denied when that of others is trampled into the dirt for any reason. I believe that no one can be free until all are free."

— Diana L. Hayes,Standing in the Shoes My Mother Made