April 23, 2014

saddeer:

zkac:

what’s Whitney Houston’s favorite type of coordination?

HAAAAAAAAAND EYEEEEEEEEEE

i hate this i hate u 

(via postvariety)

April 23, 2014
artbylexie:

Whatshisname and his stupid face.

artbylexie:

Whatshisname and his stupid face.

5:05am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZtepUy1DtDnlR
  
Filed under: sherlock love it 
April 23, 2014
tardis-mind-palace:

dan-phil-phandom:

This is one of my favourite pictures of Ben. Then you have martin in the reflection laughing.

THAT IS ACTUALLY HIM OG MY FUCK I THOUGHT IT WAS A COSPLAYER HOLY SHIT

tardis-mind-palace:

dan-phil-phandom:

This is one of my favourite pictures of Ben.
Then you have martin in the reflection laughing.

THAT IS ACTUALLY HIM OG MY FUCK I THOUGHT IT WAS A COSPLAYER HOLY SHIT

(Source: sherlwhy, via postvariety)

April 23, 2014

(Source: fredastairemovies, via thatfunnygirllauren)

April 23, 2014

alonesomes:

Let me tell you how you will be loved.
Well and honest.
Patiently and reverently.
Truly and unapologetically.
With the lights on. With the lights off.
With no one but the moon watching.
With everyone watching.
Bravely. Freely.
Always. Closely. Happily.
Let me tell me where you will find
that love.
In your own hands first, baby.
In your own damn hands.

(via thatfunnygirllauren)

April 22, 2014

perksofbeingafanboy:

I’d happily watch an 8 hour film adaptation of a book if it meant every little book detail was put in it

(via postvariety)

April 21, 2014

fyeah-haroldlloyd:

Harold is very confused about animal species - "Among Those Present" (1921)

April 21, 2014
nitratediva:

Harold Lloyd in Movie Crazy (1932).

nitratediva:

Harold Lloyd in Movie Crazy (1932).

April 21, 2014

littlehorrorshop:

Happy Birthday Harold Lloyd! » Born April 20, 1893

In the collective mindset of the masses, it’s a given assumption that F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Jay Gatsby is the dominant, all-encompassing definitive characterization of America’s Roaring Twenties.

But a more appropriate personification of the decade is Harold Lloyd, whose life, films, and most of all ‘Glass’ character reflected the social dynamics and attitudes of that transformative era. Whilst in retrospect we maybe see the jaded disillusionment of ourselves and our times in Gatsby, those living through the 1920s saw themselves in go-getter Harold Lloyd’s energetic screen presence. His endearing optimism and distinctive character is unmistakable. Always pushing the possibilities, but never pushing them into the absurd, he grounded himself firmly in the social imaginations and values that formed modern America.

Harold Lloyd captured the essence of ambition and social possibility that shaped the 20s more than any other movie idol. And among the comedy giants, there were none bigger. He was the most real, the most human. And he was handsome. He was resourceful, even when travelling at high speed through the urban phantasmagoria of the booming city. Obsessed with climbing the social ladder, making a buck, and getting the girl, he achieved all three through the genius of his inventive spirit, endless energy, and intuition; such was also the nature of Lloyd’s filmmaking. So many film ‘firsts’ were Harold’s.

Even people who don’t know Lloyd’s name will probably recognize the ubiquitous image of the young man in horn-rimmed glasses and boater hat, scaling the side of a building and dangling from the hands of its clock. Like never before, suddenly in the 20s the impossible was possible, and Harold Lloyd did the impossible, right before the audience’s eyes. He fulfilled the dream, and like scaling a building, reached the highest heights. But as every decade must end, so did the 20s, and no other decade ended quite as hard. Inevitably thus, the sparkle in Lloyd’s eye faded out.

One simply can’t deny or ignore Harold Lloyd’s universally timeless appeal. Yes, he embodied the collective dreams of social self-betterment that so tapped into the 20s movie-going public, but his comedy also stands up today as uniquely relatable and exciting. That smile could tap into the American Dream of any era. Yet he is solidified in history, tied to his time and his place. Harold Lloyd is eternally youthful; eternally 20s.

April 21, 2014
nitratediva:

Um, so did Harold Lloyd invent Gangnam Style? From Feet First (1930).

nitratediva:

Um, so did Harold Lloyd invent Gangnam Style? From Feet First (1930).

April 21, 2014

(Source: maudit)

April 20, 2014

"Girl Shy" (1924)

"Girl Shy" (1924)

(Source: fyeah-haroldlloyd, via fyeah-haroldlloyd)

April 20, 2014

Happy Birthday, Harold Clayton Lloyd  (April 20th, 1893 - March 8th, 1971)

"Laughter is the Universal language.  It establishes a common identity among people - regardless of other differences.  It is the sweetest sound in the whole world." - Harold Lloyd

(Source: fyeah-haroldlloyd, via fyeah-haroldlloyd)

April 20, 2014

haroldlloyds:

Happy Birthday Harold Clayton Lloyd, Sr. 
April 20, 1893 - March 8, 1971

"Harold Lloyd was one of the most charismatic innovators of film comedy, an excellent actor, and a consummate filmmaker." - Jack Lemmon

Harold Lloyd was, and remains, one of the most iconic figures in film history. His films influenced genres, styles and techniques that are still very much alive today. His comedic genius and timing redefined the genre of film comedy, and gave life to many sub-genres including the romantic comedy, the college comedy and the football movie. Character minded, and technically adept, his films were filled with joy, heartbreak, action, social comment, stunts and most of all the roaring spirit of the 1920s. They are still as endearing and hilarious today as they were when they came out, over 80 years ago. Lloyd was truly a genius, operating at the same level as his contemporaries, Chaplin and Keaton, and offered an alternative to the ‘grotesque’ comedy character. Lloyd’s Glass character was the boy-next-door, the average american go-getter, a character so normal that anyone could identify with him. He was The Boy. 

Lloyd’s legacy has been criminally underrepresented in the annals of film history, and it’s about time he made a return to public consciousness. He was so much more than a pair of glasses. He was the living embodiment of the spirit of 1920s America, and truly a master of cinema. 

(via factoseintolerant)

April 20, 2014

avelinas:

Writing Session: Sweat, Tears & Blood [Listen]

Three and half hour - 60 tracks from game&tv&film soundtracks + trailer music, that will definitely help you slay your writer’s block, homework, assignments, etc. This is the continuing part of ‘4-Hours Writing Session’, this time with quicker pace and some darker/lighter tunes.

(via ohsouninspiring)